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Active and passive commuting to school: influences on affect in primary school children

Citation

Hulley, Angela; Bentley, Nick; Clough, Catherine; Fishlock, Adelle; Morrell, Frances; O'Brien, James; & Radmore, Joseph (2008). Active and passive commuting to school: influences on affect in primary school children. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 79(4), 525-534.

Abstract

Active commuting among school children is being encouraged for physical and environmental reasons, but little is known about its influence on affect. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that children who walk further to school experience increased arousal and affective valence compared with children who walk a short distance. This was assessed with the children's feeling scale (CFS) and children's felt arousal scale (CFAS). Distance walked to school and affective change between home and school were assessed over a 2-week period in 99 children between 5 and 10 years of age. Home to school differences in CFS and CFAS scores were compared in children who walked a short (100–300 m); medium (301–500 m), and long distance (over 500 m). Although differences were not always statistically significant, there was evidence that the children who walked further reported a greater increase in their CFAS scores between home and school (average

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02701367.2008.10599519

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2008

Journal Title

Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Author(s)

Hulley, Angela
Bentley, Nick
Clough, Catherine
Fishlock, Adelle
Morrell, Frances
O'Brien, James
Radmore, Joseph