Skip to main content

Socio-economic factors and active commuting to school in urban Spanish adolescents: the AVENA study

Citation

Chillón, Palma; Ortega, Francisco B.; Ruiz, Jonatan R.; Pérez, Isaac J.; Martín-Matillas, Miguel; Valtueña, Jara; Gómez-Martínez, Sonia; Redondo, Carlos; Rey-López, Juan P.; & Castillo, Manuel J., et al. (2009). Socio-economic factors and active commuting to school in urban Spanish adolescents: the AVENA study. The European Journal of Public Health, 19(5), 470.

Abstract

Background: This study aimed: (i) to describe the patterns of commuting to school in urban Spanish adolescents; and (ii) to examine the associations between active commuting to school (ACS) and socio-economic factors.

Methods: From the AVENA Study, 2183 adolescents (1142 females) aged 13–18.5 years were gathered. Mode and time of transportation to school were self-reported by the adolescents. Parental education level (primary, secondary or university degree), parental professional level (managerial, skilled worker or unskilled worker/unemployed) and the type of school (public or private) were self-reported by the parents. The relationships between ACS and socio-economic factors were analysed by binary logistic regression.

Results: Nearly <65% of the adolescents reported ACS and 83% of them spent <15 min travelling to school. In male adolescents, maternal primary education level showed an odds ratio (OR) of 1.55 (95% confidence interval, 1.12–2.15), with respect to mothers with a university degree. In female adolescents, mothers with a primary education level showed an OR of 0.68 (0.50–0.92), with respect to mothers with a university degree. Low maternal professional level showed an OR of 1.70 (1.29–2.24), with respect to high maternal professional levels. Students attending public schools showed an OR of 3.47 (2.46–4.90), with respect to students from private schools.

Conclusion: Most of the adolescents actively commuted to school, yet the time spent commuting was low. Socio-economic level seems to be inversely related to the ACS in adolescents. Type of school and maternal educational level were the main predictors of ACS.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckp048

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2009

Journal Title

The European Journal of Public Health

Author(s)

Chillón, Palma
Ortega, Francisco B.
Ruiz, Jonatan R.
Pérez, Isaac J.
Martín-Matillas, Miguel
Valtueña, Jara
Gómez-Martínez, Sonia
Redondo, Carlos
Rey-López, Juan P.
Castillo, Manuel J.
Tercedor, Pablo
Delgado, Manuel